2016 JSPC Conference

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ONLINE REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED! Onsite registration will be available Thursday, June 2 and Friday, June 3.

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CONFERENCE FOCUS AREAS

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Suicide
Suicide Risk and ACEs Assessment in Primary Care
Historical and Intergenerational Trauma
Trauma Informed Schools and Structures
Community Collective Impact

WELCOME

Learning and sharing together is a wonderful opportunity to build relationships, partnerships and a focused understanding of the challenges we face. Our intention is to achieve policy, social systems/structures and environmental changes needed to break the link between ACEs and suicide in our community.

The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition welcomes you and we are thankful for your participation and engagement with the challenging issue of adverse childhood experiences and its link to suicides in Juneau and throughout southeast Alaska.

We invite you to reach out to other attendees and find new connections and partnerships. Together, we can build a nurturing community.

REGISTRATION

Registration opens May 10th. There is no registration fee however; space is limited to 200 participants.

CONTINUING EDUCATION

There is no charge for professional credit. Please see the CMEs and CEU tab for more information about the types of credits available.

REFRESHMENTS

The University of Alaska Southeast, Lakeside Grill will be catering our refreshments. Complimentary light breakfast buffets, lunches and snacks will be provided, along with coffee, tea and water throughout the day.

TARGET AUDIENCE

All members of the Juneau and outlying communities are welcome. Our hope is to engage participants from diverse sectors of our community: primary care and behavioral health providers, law enforcement, educators of all ages, social service providers, parents, youth, business and civic leaders, Alaska Tribal leaders and people from our faith communities. Registration is limited to 200.

CONFERENCE FOCUS & OBJECTIVES

The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition completed a Community Assessment in 2015. The assessment was designed to identify the underlying causes of suicide in Juneau, and to provide the foundation for a realistic and sustainable plan to reduce suicides by addressing the relationship between these underlying factors and suicide.

The JSPC needs assessment data analysis indicated that youth and adults (ages 15-30), who experienced child/adolescent trauma were at a substantial higher risk of suicide, risky behavior and mental/emotional distress. Three different sets of data — mortality rates, hospitalization rates, and survey data on suicide ideation, planning, and attempts all indicated a disproportionate suicide risk for youth and young adults with adverse childhood experiences.

Our conference objectives are to:

• Convene diverse community members and agencies whose work addresses adverse childhood experiences, trauma and suicide in youth and young adults.

• Strengthen resiliency of people who have experienced trauma, toxic stress and/or who may be experiencing suicidal ideation.

• Influence and change the policy, social systems/structures and environmental changes needed to break the link between ACEs and suicide.

• Build capacity and collaboration for the Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition and related individuals and agencies to implement actions to reduce suicide and suicide attempts in Juneau by addressing the connection between ACEs and suicide, and engaging & educating community members.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

• Knowledge of the connection between, and impact of adverse childhood experiences and trauma to the health and well-being of an individual through their lifetime, (i.e., a higher risk for suicide and significant health related issues.)

• Breaking the stigma, silence and tolerance of adverse childhood experiences will enable participants to incorporate ‘front-end’ prevention structures (routine screening, informed staff, responsive supports, etc.) to improve outcomes for youth, individuals and families.

• Knowledge of the impact and effects of historical and intergenerational trauma on the Alaska Native community and to support efforts and initiatives of culturally relevant strategies and solutions.

• Further explore the potential of a community-wide ‘collective impact’ framework or model for mobilizing a shared action plan for our community’s complex challenges in a time of diminishing resources.

EVENING COMMUNITY SESSION

Rob Anda, MD, MS, (biography) will be presenting, Thursday evening, June 2nd from 7:15 – 8:45 p.m. in the lower Egan Library. Please join us at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy the Mendenhall Quartet and hors d’oeuvres, followed by a short performance of the Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM) Chamber Group at 7:00 p.m.

Dr. Anda’s dynamic presentation is titled, “The Progressive Nature of Adverse Childhood Experiences: Building Self-Healing Communities.” He writes, “The ACE Study demonstrates the relationship of childhood abuse, neglect, domestic violence and related experiences to health throughout the lifespan. The findings are consistent with recent discoveries about the neurobiology of stress and the effect of stress on the developing central nervous system.

Unlike other studies, the ACE study assessed a wide array of traumatic childhood experiences as well as many health and social problems from adolescence to late adulthood. The number of ACEs has a graded relationship to many common medical and public health problems. An overview of these concepts and findings from the study will be presented.”

Registration is requested.

The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition is proud to co-sponsor this conference with the University of Alaska Southeast and the Division of Behavioral Health

North-Star-logo_500This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Institute for Medical Quality/CaliforniaMedical Association (IMQ/CMA) through the joint providership of North Star Behavioral Health System and the Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition. North Star Behavioral Health System is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition designates this conference for a maximum of 12.0 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s). Participants should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the conference.

Partial or full conference registration is possible. Please select carefully, as rooms have limited seating. By registering for breakout sessions you can be assured of a reserved space in that session.

Four keynotes and 12 different breakout sessions (many are repeated) span the two days of the conference. Each attendee can select up to 4 breakout sessions to attend.

Our conference topics and discussions are intense in nature, and we have built in time for attendees to enjoy refreshments, network and have time to be outside and appreciate the beauty of the UAS campus.

Additionally, we will have an Evening Community Presentation, Thursday, June 2nd in the lower Egan Library at UAS. Please join us at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy the Light Proof and hors d’oeuvres, followed by a short performance of the Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM) Chamber Group at 7:00 p.m. Rob Anda’s, MD, MS, dynamic presentation is titled, “The Progressive Nature of Adverse Childhood Experiences: Building Self-Healing Communities.”

ROBERT F. ANDA

Anda

Robert F. Anda, MD, MS ACE Interface, LLC– Co-Founder

ACE Study—Co-Founder and Co-Principal Investigator

Atlanta, Georgia

Dr. Anda graduated from Rush Medical College in 1979 and received his Board Certification in Internal Medicine in 1982. During 1982-1984 he completed a Fellowship in Preventive Medicine at the University of

Wisconsin where he also received a Masters Degree (MS) in Epidemiology.

He spent 20 years conducting research as a medical officer in the U.S. Public Health Service at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. His research involved a variety of areas including disease surveillance, behavioral health, mental health and disease, cardiovascular disease, and childhood determinants of health.

He played the principal role in the design of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study and serves as its Co-Principal Investigator. Findings from the ACE Study have been presented at Congressional Briefings and numerous conferences around the world. The ACE Study is being replicated in numerous countries by the World Health Organization (WHO) and is now being used to assess the childhood origins of health and social problems in more than 30 U.S. states.

He has more than 200 peer-reviewed and government publications such as the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) and book chapters. In addition, he has received numerous awards and recognition for scientific achievements. He and his work are highlighted in the documentary Resilience by James Redford that was accepted to the 2015 Sundance Film Festival and is now being shown across the nation.

Dr. Anda now works in his role as Co-Founder of ACE Interface to deliver training materials at the state and community level about neurobiology, epigenetics, ACEs, resilience, and community capacity development. His dream is to help create a trauma-informed Nation.

CHALYEE ÉESH (RICHARD PETERSON)

President Peterson

Chalyee Éesh (Richard Peterson) President, Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida

Indian Tribes of Alaska

Juneau, Alaska

Chalyee Éesh (Richard Peterson) is Tlingit from the Kaagwaantaan clan. Richard grew up in Kasaan, Alaska and is a life long Alaska Native resident of Southeast Alaska. Prior to being elected as president of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Central Council), Richard served as Chief Executive Officer of Prince of Wales Tribal Enterprise Consortium, LLC (POWTEC), president of the Organized Village of Kasaan (OVK), mayor/city council member for the City of Kasaan, and member of the Southeast Island School District Board of Education. He has been a Delegate to the Central Council since 2000. During his tenure with OVK, Richard fostered growth through innovative program and economic development, developing competent and reputable grant and fiscal management procedures. OVK’s annual budget increased from $13,000 to over $4 million dollars through widespread program development and strategic pursuit of grant funding. Richard has developed the skills necessary to effectively represent and communicate the needs of Southeast Alaska Native people. He is adept at negotiating and team building and has worked to continually build lasting relationships that prove to be mutually beneficial to all stakeholders. Richard believes in a proactive approach to achieve win-win scenarios and continues to shape the future of the economic and social well-being of our tribal citizens through collaborative efforts and local economic development initiatives.

JOHN BROWN

JOHN BROWN

John Brown, M.Ed.

Principal, Mat-Su Central School

Wasilla, Alaska

John is a third generation life long Alaskan. During his thirty year professional career in education, twenty years were spent teaching and coaching. He is currently the principal of Mat-Su Central School in Wasilla, AK where 1560 students engage in individualized learning in a K-12 program. John is respected and admired by his staff and the community. John is an innovator who won’t stand still for status quo; he has been influential on a local and state level. He and his high school sweetheart raised three daughters who are all currently working in public education in K-12 and post
secondary. His inspiration to enter the education field came while working with young people in a residential homeless center during his college years in California. John has often been overheard asking the question, “is it good for kids?”

DEB HAYNES

Deb Haynes

Deb Haynes, M.Ed., LPC

Private Practice Therapist, Wellness and Health AWARE Counselor, Mat-Su Central School

Wasilla, Alaska

Deb is in a new job this year as an AWARE (Advancing Wellness and Resilience in Education) counselor at Mat-Su Central School where she provides counseling, consultation, training, teaching, and referrals to parents, students, and staff. Deb taught Human Relations, Psychology and Leadership at Wasilla High School for 16 years. She has been working concurrently as a mental health therapist and has her own part-time private practice. As an ACE and Youth Mental Health First Aid trainer, Deb hopes to influence, prevent, and mitigate the damage of trauma in her area and across the state. Deb is the mother of three, grandmother of one baby boy, inherited grandmother of two little girls, and wife of one! 🙂 Deb serves on the steering committee for ROCK Mat-Su, the initiative to increase the health and resiliency of children and families.

JASON MARVEL

JASON MARVEL

Jason Marvel, M.Ed.

Principal, Burchell High School

Wasilla, Alaska

Jason Marvel has been in education for 18 years. 17 of those years was spent as an English teacher at multiple comprehensive high schools. He is one of two trained Freedom Writer teachers in Alaska – a teaching methodology that supports at-risk and wounded students. Mr. Marvel also served as the head boys basketball coach for both Wasilla High School and Palmer High School. In 2007, Mr. Marvel and his Wasilla team won the 4A state championship. As a coach at Palmer High School, he was instrumental in implementing Coaching Boys Into Men, a program that promotes respectful behavior among players to help prevent relationship abuse, harassment, and sexual assault. Mr. Marvel is in his first year as the principal of Burchell High School.

DIANE DEMOSKI

DIANE DEMOSKI

Diane Demoski, MSN Nurse

Burchell High School

Wasilla, Alaska

Diane Demoski is currently a School Nurse at Burchell HS, an Alternative School, in Wasilla. She has a Masters of Science Degree in Nursing and has worked in various settings including 12 years as an Itinerant Public Health Nurse in rural Alaska. She is currently an ACE/RESILIENCY trainer and also a Youth Mental Health First Aid instructor. She has written and managed many State and Federal grants addressing substance abuse and Mental Health issues in youth. She is passionate about working with Wounded Students and is currently a member of the Steering committee with ROCK Mat SU which stands for Raising Our Children With Kindness and has a mission of reducing child maltreatment.

DESIRE' SHEPLER

DESIRE SHEPLER

Desiré Shepler, MPH

Director of R.O.C.K Mat-Su

Palmer, Alaska

Desiré Shepler is the Director of Raising Our Children With Kindness ( R.O.C.K.) Mat-Su, a cross-sector collaborative working to promote family resilience and reduce child maltreatment in the Mat-Su Borough. She has a Master of Public Health from the University of Alaska Anchorage and a background in creating and managing community coalitions working to address health challenges in multiple Alaskan communities. Desiré loves working with communities and is passionate about helping to create systems and social
supports that foster resilient families and well cared for children, two facts that make her current job her dream job. Desiré lives in her hometown of Palmer with her partner and three teenage children.

DEBORAH BOCK

DEBORAH BOCK

Deborah Bock, MSW, LCSW

Professor, University of Alaska, Anchorage

Anchorage, Alaska

Deborah Bock received her B.A. in psychology and her MSW from the University of California at Berkeley. She worked as a bilingual (Spanish-English) school social worker for ten years in New York and California before moving to Alaska. She currently teaches Spanish at the University of Alaska, Anchorage. Deborah is a self- proclaimed “ACEs fanatic.” She has given presentations about the ACE Study and resilience since 2009.

VERA STARBARD

VERA STARBARD

Vera Starbard, Playwright

www.OurVoicesWillBeHeard.org

Anchorage, Alaska

Born with Tlingit and Dena’ina heritage, Vera Starbard (Bedard) turned to Native culture for writing inspiration. She began editing newspapers in 2000, and made writing and editing part of her work since. Vera completed a fiction book with an award from the Rasmuson Foundation, and received numerous state and national awards for both editing and writing. She is currently First Alaskans Magazine Editor, Dark Winter Productions Co-Founder, and Writing Raven Communications Owner. This year Vera’s full-length play “Our Voices Will Be Heard” premiered in Juneau, Hoonah, and Anchorage, produced by Perseverance Theatre. In July Vera will begin a three-year residency with Perseverance, with the promise of three new plays to come.

ANNIE O. DERTHICK

ANNIE DERTHICK

Annie O. Derthick, Ph.D.

Providence Family Medicine Center

Anchorage, Alaska

Dr. Derthick is currently completing her post-doctoral clinical licensure at Providence Family Medicine Center, which is an integrated primary care clinic attached to the Alaska Family Medicine Residency and a Level III Patient Centered Medical Home. She has extensive experience in integrated primary care, including resident education, particularly related to the needs of the underserved and
patients with a history of trauma. In her current role as Group Visit Clinical Therapist, Dr. Derthick trains residents in innovative, alternative service delivery methods for chronic disease management.

ELECTRA GARDINIER

ELECTRA GARDINIER

Electra Gardinier, BA Communications Specialist, Project Coordinator

Alaska Network on Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault

Juneau, Alaska

Electra Gardinier, started working with the Alaska Network on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (ANDVSA) as the Office Manager in 2011. In 2013, Electra began working to build ANDVSA’s Communications Project. Through the Communications Project, Electra trains victim service providers throughout Alaska on social media, agency privacy, communications, self-care, and technology safety and technology abuse. Electra grew up in Juneau, Alaska. She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from Portland State University in Women’s Studies with a minor in Black Studies in 2010. In her free time she enjoys traveling, sewing, skiing and hiking with her family.

RACHEL ROMBERG

RACHEL ROMBERG

Rachel Romberg

Prevention Director, South Peninsula Haven House

Homer, Alaska

Rachel Romberg loves hats, and wears many of them. At South Peninsula Haven House in Homer, AK she wears the Director of Prevention hat where she works to involve the whole community in violence prevention. She also wears the coordinator hat for the Southern Kenai Peninsula Resilience Coalition. A diverse collection of agencies and individuals, this group envisions communities in the Homer-area that cultivate healthy relationships and resilient families free of violence and substance abuse. Under both of those is her survivor advocate hat, which she never takes off. Having started as a shelter advocate at Haven House in 2009, the stories of the women and children, men and boys whom she has been honored to serve are always with her, as she works towards building a compassionate community and a violence-free world.

CME & CEU Overview

We are proud to offer the opportunity for high-level professional training, across sectors of our community and appreciate your willingness to engage in these important areas of need in order to provide greater service and supports to Juneau’s youth and families.

Up to 12 CMEs (medical staff, counselors) and one CEU (upper division, school staff) are available at no cost. The JSPC is currently seeking approval for social workers to earn 3 CEUs of cross-cultural training, specifically related to Alaska Natives. At the time of registration, please identify your intention for professional credit. If you have questions, please contact Becky Roth.

It will be required that each attendee seeking professional credit, also complete our conference evaluation.

CMEs (medical staff, counselors)

This conference is designated and approved for up to a maximum of 12 hours AMA PRA Category 1 credits™. North Star Behavioral Health in Anchorage, AK is an accredited continuing medical education (CME) provider of activities that receive AMA (American Medical Association’s Physician’s Recognition Award) PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Since this is awarded to physicians, it is the highest level of continuing education credit, and is widely accepted for re-licensure for social workers, licensed professional counselors, nurses, personnel from the court systems, military, ANPs, MDs and PhDs and many other professional fields. North Star has generously made these CMEs at no cost to attendees. JSPC has followed strict guidelines to meet the qualifications to be approved.

If you have indicated that you wish to receive CMEs for conference participation, you will be asked to sign-in at each session. After completing the post-conference evaluation, you will receive your certificate. It is the responsibility of the attendee to self-report the actual number of hours they attend.

The JSPC is seeking pre-approval with the Alaska Board of Social Workers, for 3 hours of ‘cross-cultural training, specifically related to Alaska Natives,’ and hope to have this confirmed by May 25th. Please contact Becky Roth for an update.

CEUs (school staff)

An (1) upper division (S593) CEU is also an option for professional credit for educators. If you have indicated that you wish to earn a CEU, please complete the formal written form at the registration desk during the conference. The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition has generously offered to fund the tuition fee for anyone needing this assistance.

To comply with regulations for 12.5 contact hours, full conference attendance will be mandatory, as well as attending the Community Evening Session, offered June 2nd, from 6:30 – 8:45 p.m. (7:15 – 8:45 p.m. presentation). (link) A two page reflection and application paper will also be required, and due on June, 17th. Details of this assignment will be available at the registration desk throughout the conference.

 NorthStarThis activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Institute for Medical Quality/CaliforniaMedical Association (IMQ/CMA) through the joint providership of North Star Behavioral Health System and the Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition. North Star Behavioral Health System is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition designates this conference for a maximum of 12.0 AMA PRA Category 1 credit(s). Participants should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the conference.

EXHIBITORS

We welcome local and statewide agencies and providers to exhibit their services during the conference. Exhibit space is available at no charge. For more information please contact Bronwyn Saito.

Aspen Suites

ACCOMODATIONS

We have reserved a block of rooms at the Aspen Suites Hotel, for out-of-town guests attending our conference. Rooms are available for $165.00 a night from June 1st – 3rd. Reserving these rooms will only be available until May 18th. When making your reservations, please be sure to mention that you’re attending the Juneau Suicide Prevention Coalition Conference to secure this rate.

Aspen Suites Hotel is located at 8400 Airport Way. For a complete list of suite amenities and features, visit their website.

REGISTRATION & GENERAL ASSISTANCE

Please register for the conference by visiting the registration link. If you have questions or need assistance, contact Bronwyn Saito. During the conference, there will be staff available at all times at the registration desk, to assist with general inquiries and concerns. In the event of an emergency, call 9-1-1 on your cell phone.

REFRESHMENTS

The University of Alaska Southeast, Lakeside Grill will be catering our refreshments. Complimentary light breakfast buffets, lunches, and snacks will be provided, along with coffee, tea and water throughout the day.

SHARING UAS SPACE

We are guests on the UAS Campus. Please be respectful and mindful of other learning sessions, staff and students sharing the Egan Wing and Library with us. Please use quiet voices, and the internal stairs (vs. inside library stairs) to access the lower library event space on the ground level. This will reduce the disruption to others. Thank you!

PARKING AT UAS

Ample parking is available at the UAS Campus. Please be considerate of surrounding construction, and allow for ample time to walk to the Egan Complex.

NAME BADGES

Name badges serve as the conference attendee’s entrance to all sessions and meals. Please wear your name badge at all times.

CELL PHONES AND INTERNET

Complimentary WiFi is available in all event and classroom spaces. We request that your cell phones be silenced at all times during the conference, and that phone conversations occur outside, so that other attendees are able to enjoy all social & learning spaces.

QUIET ROOM

Please take very good care of yourself during the conference. At times the content may be emotionally triggering or you may want to take a break. We have a quiet room reserved for this. Also, there are professional counselors on site who can offer emotional support. Please request their support by asking for assistance at the registration desk.

SMOKING

The University of Alaska is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment for its students, employees, and visitors, by prohibiting tobacco use and smoking, including the use of electronic cigarettes and similar products, within its campuses and facilities. Smoking or the use of tobacco products is allowed in personally owned vehicles parked or being driven on campus and on public sidewalks or public rights-of-way that border the campus.

Thursday, June 2 - Day 1

8:30 am - 9:15 am | Registration & Breakfast

General Sessions

9:30 am - 11:00 am | Keynote: “The Progressive Nature of Adverse Childhood Experiences: Building Self-Healing Communities

Rob Anda, MD, MS

The ACE Study demonstrates the relationship of childhood abuse, neglect, domestic violence and related experiences to health throughout the lifespan. The findings are consistent with recent discoveries about the neurobiology of stress and the effect of stress on the developing central nervous system.

Unlike other studies, the ACE study assessed a wide array of traumatic childhood experiences as well as many health and social problems from adolescence to late adulthood. The number of ACEs has a graded relationship to many common medical and public health problems. An overview of these concepts and findings from the study will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the basic biology of the effects of childhood trauma on neurodevelopment
  • To understand that Adverse Childhood Experiences are common and highly interrelated
  • The number of Adverse Childhood Experiences has a strong, graded, “dose-response” relationship to many health and social problems. This is consistent with the impact of cumulative stress on childhood neurodevelopment
  • Understand the concept of the “ACE pyramid” life course model for the long-term effects of impaired neurodevelopment
  • Review the “dose-response” relationship of the ACE score to:
    • Leading causes of death
    • Mental health problems-including the risk of suicide and risk factors for suicide attempts
    • Substance abuse
    • Reproductive health
    • Violent re-victimization
  • Review the obvious costs of ACEs to society
  • Understand the intergenerational aspect of ACEs
  • ACEs lead to many different problems within individuals—the concept of comorbidity
  • Review of ideas needed to change the status quo

11:00 am - 11:15 am | Break & Refreshments

Complimentary refreshments.

11:15 am - 12:30 pm | Breakout Sessions - Group 1

Breakout 1A: Embracing the Challenge: Reduce ACEs, Heal Trauma, and Build Resilience

Deborah Bock, MSW, LCSW

As research has revealed the harmful effects of childhood adversity and toxic stress, a worldwide movement has been growing to address the problem. Participants will be invited to embrace the challenge to reduce ACEs, heal trauma, and build resilience in our communities and in our own lives.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to summarize the key findings of the original ACE Study
  • Participants will reflect on actions that they might take to (a) reduce ACEs, (b) heal trauma, and (c) build resilience in their community

Breakout 1B: How Collective Impact Can be Used to Build Self-Healing Communities

Desiré Shepler, MPH and Rachel Romberg

When most people hear about the ACEs study their initial response is, “What can I do about this?” While it is easy to feel impassioned by this knowledge, it can be hard to know what individuals and communities can do to help protect kids and reduce ACEs. This session will focus on how Collective Impact can be a framework that helps address the question, “What can my community and I do to help stop ACEs?”

Learning Objectives:

•    To understand how Collective Impact can be used to help all sectors see their place in addressing trauma

•    Identify concrete steps participants can take in beginning to explore Collective Impact as a means of addressing child maltreatment prevention

Breakout 1C: ACEs—Breaking it Down

Jason Marvel, M.Ed, Diane Demoski, MSN, Deb Haynes, M.Ed., LPC and John Brown, M.Ed.

This session will focus on the significance and impact of ACE research for educators, and examine how schools can incorporate tools and structures to build relationships and collaborate to address the ongoing needs of students who are wounded.

Learning Objectives:

•    To ensure practical understanding of the neurobiological and epigenetic effects of trauma

•    To build understanding of the bridge between ACEs and resilience, and to increase school and community capacity for mitigating trauma effects in youth

Breakout 1D: The Koo.Eex and Community Health

Vera Starbard

For 10,000 years, the Native people of Alaska treated physical problems in tandem with mental and spiritual health. How can we use the practices and traditions of different cultures to look at our own ideas of what future wellness can be in our communities?

Learning Objectives:

•   How the ACEs study can be viewed in the context of different cultures

•   How recalling and encouraging traditional practices can restore community and individual wellness

12:30 pm - 1:45 pm | Boxed Lunch

General Sessions

1:45 pm - 2:30 pm | Keynote: “When We Know Who We Are, We Don’t Hurt Ourselves”

Chalyee Éesh (Richard Peterson), President of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and Panel, Lenora Walker, and Justin McDonald

Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and Panel Members, Lenora Walker & Justin McDonald Central Council offers a variety of family-centered services focused on promoting and supporting safe and stable families. These services assist individuals in attaining the education and skills necessary to support healthy lifestyles, develop meaningful careers and engage in the traditional activities of their communities.

Learning Objectives:

• Participants will build greater understanding of culture identity and wellness.

• Participants will be presented information on recognizing culture differences associated with suicide and suicide prevention.

2:30 pm - 2:45 pm | Break & Refreshments

Complimentary refreshments.

2:45 pm - 4:00 pm | Breakout sessions - Group 2

Breakout 2A: “When We Know Who We Are, We Don’t Hurt Ourselves”

Chalyee Éesh (Richard Peterson), President of the Central Council of the Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and Panel, Lenora Walker, and Justin McDonald

…a continuation from their keynote:

Central Council offers a variety of family-centered services focused on promoting and supporting safe and stable families. These services assist individuals in attaining the education and skills necessary to support healthy lifestyles, develop meaningful careers and engage in the traditional activities of their communities.

Learning Objectives:

• Participants will build greater understanding of culture identity and wellness.

• Participants will be presented information on recognizing culture differences associated with suicide and suicide prevention.

Breakout 2B: ACEs in Alaska: Current Data and Cause for Hope

Deborah Bock, MSW, LCSW

Deborah Bock will present data from the Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Study (BRFSS), the Youth Risk Behavior Study (YRBS) and the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). This up-to-date information provides some clear direction for our efforts to reduce childhood adversity and build resilience in Alaska families and communities.

Learning Objectives:

•    Participants will be able to compare key findings of the CDC ACE Study with data collected for the Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), and National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH)

•    Participants will know where to find current information about the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and physical and behavioral health of Alaskan adults and children

Breakout 2C: Cyberbullying: The Impact on Children & Teens and How to Build a Positive Community Response

Electra Gardiner, BA

In this presentation, participants will learn more about what cyberbullying is and how it impacts youth in our community. Through this presentation, participants will be able to draw connections between cyberbullying, adverse childhood experiences, and suicide. Finally, this interactive presentation will give participants tools to respond to and prevent cyberbullying.

Learning Objectives:

•     Participants will be able to define what cyberbullying is and why it’s different than other forms of bullying

•     Participants will learn the impact cyberbullying can have on students

•     Participants will gain tools to talk to children and teens about the severity of cyberbullying

•     Participants will learn some available resources for support and prevention of cyberbullying

Breakout 2D: The Greatest Story You’ve Ever Told: How Arts and Personal Storytelling Impacts Mental Health

Vera Starbard

Storytelling, dancing, the arts – are all integral parts of Tlingit people’s wellness for thousands of years. Today, storytelling through the arts and creative pursuits can not only be an important piece of healing, but build up protective factors in all ages. Through a hands-on arts experience, playwright Vera Starbard will guide participants through understanding how arts have impacted mental and physical wellness in cultures for generations and to learn creative expression in mental health healing and prevention methods.

Learning Objectives:

•    Participants will understand multiple forms of creative expression to aid in mental health healing and prevention

•    Participants will understand how current and historical cultural arts impact mental and physical wellness

Evening Community Session:

6:30 – 7:15 p.m. Light Proof, a jazz band & hors d’oeuvres, followed by a short performance by the Juneau Alaska Music Matters (JAMM) Chamber Group.

7:15 – 8:45 p.m. Keynote: “The Progressive Nature of Adverse Childhood Experiences: Building Self-Healing Communities” Rob Anda, MD, MS

The ACE Study demonstrates the relationship of childhood abuse, neglect, domestic violence and related experiences to health throughout the lifespan. The findings are consistent with recent discoveries about the neurobiology of stress and the effect of stress on the developing central nervous system.

Unlike other studies, the ACE study assessed a wide array of traumatic childhood experiences as well as many health and social problems from adolescence to late adulthood. The number of ACEs has a graded relationship to many common medical and public health problems. An overview of these concepts and findings from the study will be presented.

Learning Objectives:

  • To understand the basic biology of the effects of childhood trauma on neurodevelopment
  • To understand that Adverse Childhood Experiences are common and highly interrelated
  • The number of Adverse Childhood Experiences has a strong, graded, “dose-response” relationship to many health and social problems. This is consistent with the impact of cumulative stress on childhood neurodevelopment
  • Understand the concept of the “ACE pyramid” life course model for the long-term effects of impaired neurodevelopment
  • Review the “dose-response” relationship of the ACE score to:
    • Leading causes of death
    • Mental health problems-including the risk of suicide and risk factors for suicide attempts
    • Substance abuse
    • Reproductive health
    • Violent re-victimization
  • Review the obvious costs of ACEs to society
  • Understand the intergenerational aspect of ACEs
  • ACEs lead to many different problems within individuals—the concept of comorbidity
  • Review of ideas needed to change the status quo

Friday, June 3 - Day 2

8:30 am - 9:00 am | Registration & Breakfast

General Sessions

9:15 am - 10:00 am| Keynote: Resiliency in the Wounded Student

Deb Haynes, M.Ed., LPC, John Brown, M.Ed., Jason Marvel, M.Ed. & Diane Demoski, MSN

This dynamic team of Alaskan educators will present on issues relating to creating trauma-informed schools, building and rebuilding trust and relationships with youth and families impacted by trauma, and the need for clear communication and partnerships in a time of diminishing funds and resources.

Learning Objective:

  • Participants will gain information about school practices and resources, building and fortifying trusting relationships and partnerships with youth, their families and the greater community

10:00 am - 10:15 am | Break & Refreshments

Complimentary refreshments.

10:15 am - 11:00 am | Keynote: How to Work Towards Collective Impact

Desiré Shepler, MPH and Rachel Romberg

No single organization can solve a complex social problem alone. In the face of this, many organizations and sectors have created partnerships, coalitions, and networks to work together and create change. The Collective Impact framework was created based on research of collaboratives that were successfully making progress at scale. Learn about the conditions of Collective Impact and how cross-sector collaboration can be used to achieve measurable effects on complex social problems.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will determine if the preconditions for Collective Impact exist
  • Participants will identify the five conditions of Collective Impact

11:00 am - 12:15 pm | Private screening of KPJR Films, "Resilience"

Directed by James Redford

The original ACE research was controversial, but the outcomes revealed the most important public health findings of a generation. Resilience is a one-hour documentary that delves into the science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the birth of a new movement to treat and prevent toxic stress. Now understood to be one of the leading causes of everything from heart disease and cancer to substance abuse and depression, extremely stressful experiences in childhood can alter brain development and have lifelong effects on health and behavior.

However, as experts and practitioners profiled in Resilience are proving, what is predictable is preventable. These physicians, educators, social workers and communities are daring to talk about the effects of divorce, abuse and neglect. And they are using cutting edge science to help the next generation break the cycles of adversity and disease.

11:00 am - 12:15 pm | Cyberbullying: The Impact on Children & Teens and How to Build a Positive Community Response

Electra Gardiner, BA

In this presentation, participants will learn more about what cyberbullying is and how it impacts youth in our community. Through this presentation, participants will be able to draw connections between cyberbullying, adverse childhood experiences, and suicide. Finally, this interactive presentation will give participants tools to respond to and prevent cyberbullying.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to define what cyberbullying is and why it’s different than other forms of bullying
  • Participants will learn the impact cyberbullying can have on students
  • Participants will gain tools to talk to children and teens about the severity of cyberbullying
  • Participants will learn some available resources for support and prevention of cyberbullying

12:15 pm - 1:30 pm | Boxed Lunch

1:30 pm - 2:45 pm | Breakout sessions - Group 3

Breakout 3A: Trauma Sensitive Schools and Resiliency

Jason Marvel, M.Ed., and Diane Demoski, MSN

This inspirational presentation will examine the skills, strategies and structures that are embraced in a trauma sensitive school. We will review the necessary resources to truly create a safe and supportive environment for students. Resources to assist in teaching resiliency skills and how to change a school culture, and therefore the lives of wounded students will be shared, as well as stories and examples from real schools and students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the structure, skills and strategies of a trauma sensitive school
  • Participants will gain resources to teach resiliency skills to students
  • Participants will learn ways to change a school culture to support wounded students

Breakout 3B: A Tale of Two Cities: The Developmental Steps of Collective Impact

Desiré Shepler, MPH and Rachel Romberg

This shared session will provide an overview of the implementation of the Collective Impact framework. Two presenters will describe how cross sector community collaboratives are working to improve the lives of children and families in the Southern Kenai Peninsula and the Mat-Su Borough. The purpose of this presentation is to move beyond a theoretical explanation of Collective Impact to a conversation of what it means to “do” Collective Impact. The presenters will engage participants in a discussion of Juneau’s local efforts, challenges and ‘next steps.’

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the five phases of Collective Impact
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the work of a collaborative using the Collective Impact framework

Breakout 3C: ACEs in Alaska: Current Data and Cause for Hope

Deborah Bock, MSW, LCSW

Deborah Bock will present data from the Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Study (BRFSS), the Youth Risk Behavior Study (YRBS) and the National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH). This up-to-date information provides some clear direction for our efforts to reduce childhood adversity and build resilience in Alaska families and communities.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to compare key findings of the CDC ACE Study with data collected for the Alaska Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Alaska Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), and National Survey of Children’s Health (NSCH)
  • Participants will know where to find current information about the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and physical and behavioral health of Alaskan adults and children

Breakout 3D: Cyberbullying: The Impact on Children & Teens and How to Build a Positive Community Response

Electra Gardiner, BA

How to Build a Positive Response

In this presentation, participants will learn more about what cyberbullying is and how it impacts youth in our community. Through this presentation, participants will be able to draw connections between cyberbullying, adverse childhood experiences, and suicide. Finally, this interactive presentation will give participants tools to respond to and prevent cyberbullying.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to define what cyberbullying is and why it is different than other forms of bullying
  • Participants will learn the impact cyberbullying can have on students
  • Participants will gain tools to talk to children and teens about the severity of cyberbullying
  • Participants will learn some available resources for support and prevention of cyberbullying

Breakout 3E: Suicide Risk Assessment in Primary Care

Annie O. Derthick, Ph.D.

This session will outline how to conduct a suicide risk assessment in a primary care setting, including how to evaluate risk and protective factors utilizing formal screening tools and informal interviewing. We will review the different levels of risk and associated, appropriate safety planning and follow-up. We will also discuss the development of office protocol to respond to suicidal ideation and cover necessary documentation.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will understand the importance of conducting suicide risk assessments in a primary care setting, and
  • They will be able to identify the primary risk factors for suicide
  • Additionally, attendees will learn at least one way of conducting a thorough suicide risk assessment, and they will gain exposure to associated standardized screening tools
  • Finally attendees will review appropriate documentation practices for suicide risk assessments

3:00 pm - 4:15 pm| Breakout sessions - Group 4

Breakout 4A: Trauma Sensitive Schools and Resiliency

Jason Marvel, M.Ed., and Diane Demoski, MSN

This inspirational presentation will examine the skills, strategies and structures that are embraced in a trauma sensitive school. We will review the necessary resources to truly create a safe and supportive environment for students. Resources to assist in teaching resiliency skills and how to change a school culture, and therefore the lives of wounded students will be shared, as well as stories and examples from real schools and students.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand the structure, skills and strategies of a trauma sensitive school
  • Participants will gain resources to teach resiliency skills to students
  • Participants will learn ways to change a school culture to support wounded students

Breakout 4B: A Tale of Two Cities: The Developmental Steps of Collective Impact

Desiré Shepler, MPH and Rachel Romberg

This shared session will provide an overview of the implementation of the Collective Impact framework. Two presenters will describe how cross sector community collaboratives are working to improve the lives of children and families in the Southern Kenai Peninsula and the Mat-Su Borough. The purpose of this presentation is to move beyond a theoretical explanation of Collective Impact to a conversation of what it means to “do” Collective Impact. The presenters will engage participants in a discussion of Juneau’s local efforts, challenges and ‘next steps.’

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will be able to identify the five phases of Collective Impact
  • Participants will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the work of a collaborative using the Collective Impact framework

Breakout 4C: The Greatest Story You’ve Ever Told: How Arts and Personal Storytelling Impacts Mental Health

Vera Starbard

Storytelling, dancing, the arts – all integral parts of Tlingit people’s wellness for thousands of years. Today, storytelling through the arts and creative pursuits can not only be an important piece of healing, but build up protective factors in all ages. Through a hands-on arts experience, playwright Vera Starbard will guide participants through understanding how arts have impacted mental and physical wellness in cultures for generations & to learn creative expression in mental health healing and prevention methods.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participants will understand multiple forms of creative expression to aid in mental health healing and prevention.
  • Participants will understand how current and historical cultural arts impact mental and physical wellness.

Breakout 4D: Private screening of KPJR Films, Resilience

Directed by James Redford

The original ACE research was controversial, but the outcomes revealed the most important public health findings of a generation. Resilience is a one-hour documentary that delves into the science of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the birth of a new movement to treat and prevent toxic stress. Now understood to be one of the leading causes of everything from heart disease and cancer to substance abuse and depression, extremely stressful experiences in childhood can alter brain development and have lifelong effects on health and behavior.

However, as experts and practitioners profiled in Resilience are proving, what is predictable is preventable. These physicians, educators, social workers and communities are daring to talk about the effects of divorce, abuse and neglect. And they are using cutting edge science to help the next generation break the cycles of adversity and disease.

Breakout 4E: ACEs and Primary Care: Key Takeaways

Annie O. Derthick, Ph.D.

This session is designed to help attendees apply their knowledge of ACEs to primary care. We will discuss the ways in which developmental trauma can impact working relationships in a primary care setting, and what primary care providers can do to improve those relationships and support patients who have experienced developmental trauma. Attendees will also learn ways to ask about developmental trauma in a primary care setting and how to incorporate that information into treatment plans.

Learning Objective:

  • Attendees will be able to identify some ways in which they can use an understanding of developmental trauma in the treatment of patients in primary care, including: 12
  • ways to discuss trauma history
  • ways in which developmental trauma can impact the working relationship between a provider and patient
  • and how a history of developmental trauma can “look” in adult populations, as well as ways to support patients in their success

4:15 pm - 4:45 pm | Closing Thanks & farewell performance